Archives for posts with tag: Santa Clarita

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An overlook of the landscape and city of Canyon Country from sand canyon road’s bear divide, on the path to the historical Nike missile base site.

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My first trip for the year to a popular local backcountry getaway spot in Santa Clarita Ca. known as Bouquet falls.

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I decided to take a little hike this afternoon at the now abandoned San Francisquito canyon road path (Ca.) which is also the site of the remaining rubble and ruins of the historical Saint Francis Dam disaster of 1928. Upon venturing off the course of the 1/2 mile or so ruined road path to where a stream of water was, I came across this large chunk of concrete rubble with some extra long rebar exposed and twisting in all kinds of chaotic craziness. For some reason, I was reminded of the 1980’s John Carpenter version of THE THING upon seeing all the long freakishly twisted metal.

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The weather is finally getting a bit chilly in the California desert with mornings reaching down to the 30’s and 40’s with some fog and cloud coverage growing depending on where you are situated. However, with daylight ending images still looking like this, it’s hard to imagine it’s been feeling chilly at all.

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A view of the other side of the landscape along the broken path of San Francisquito road Ca.
The large mass in the left foreground is most likely more leftover concrete and sediment remains from the St. Francis dam disaster, while in highest peak of the left background you can see a rock formation that seems to be much different from the rest of the hills and landscape. The formation looks to be something more reminiscent of the great mass of geological formations you will find in the famous Vasquez Canyon Rock which would be located somewhere a bit further northeast of the area photographed. It’s always fascinating to me to see the strange alterations of landscape and oddities that seem to stand out from the rest of the land, and wonder just how they had been formed millions of years ago.

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As winter is nearing and many on the east coast and elsewhere are already feeling, here in SoCal (even though the mornings are starting to get a bit chilly) the afternoons are still pushing anywhere from 70 to close to 90 degrees. Dandelions and other flowers are still hearty blooming in the middle of the deserts as if we were still fresh in spring or summer.

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Why anyone would deface such great tranquil settings of nature is beyond me?
I could not stand to see the original scene here be defiled by tasteless graffiti all over these rocks so I had to attempt a bit of retouching to imagine this place as it once was, before it became a tagger and thug hangout. I literally had to cut the BS from the surface of these rocks. Hopefully, I have wiped any trace of what is currently seen when physically visiting this area and restored a bit of the nostalgic tranquility that used to be felt here. Of course, the black and white may help define it a little bit more.

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A small portion of a stream in San Francisquito which had a little small running current providing it’s own natural aeration of the stream. I was particularly drawn to the green covered rock sprouting what almost looked like clovers.

My black and white series of my hike along the broken path of san francisquito road which was ruined by heavy rains in early 2005. As many interesting nature finds that there are along this now broken stretch of path, it brings a strange feeling to know that this whole area at one time was covered by a raging wall of water that started nearly 200 ft high when the St. Francis Dam failed in the disaster of 1928.

SAMSUNG CSCView of section of downed road path and parts of leftover concrete from the St. Francis dam can be seen to the left. The original mass of concrete once stood nearly 200 feet tall.

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Memorial plaque of the St. Francis dam on concrete remains of dam.

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Along the start of my trail of the now broken unused section of  San Francisquito road.

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Along my trail. Section of  downed road now mostly covered by trees and brush.

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Around the middle of the path of my trail.

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Concrete dust, rubble, and chunks of the St. Francis dam remains.

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A nice portion of the remains of the St. Francis dam which can easily be seen and walked through from the side of the now unused section of San Francisquito road which can be viewed all the way to the right upper edge.

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A narrow bridge which was also used on the commute and now abandoned from the rains that had compromised this section of road.

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A section of road that had given way to the rain.

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Hydroelectric power plant known as Power station 2. This is actually a rebuild of the original power station 2 which was caught in the wake of the St. Francis dam collapse and completely destroyed. You can see the three large pipelines that distribute water through the valley and other hydroelectric plants in California.

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A little closer view of the reconstructed hydroelectric power plant.

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Lower bed of the hydroelectric power plant station 2.

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