My black and white series of my hike along the broken path of san francisquito road which was ruined by heavy rains in early 2005. As many interesting nature finds that there are along this now broken stretch of path, it brings a strange feeling to know that this whole area at one time was covered by a raging wall of water that started nearly 200 ft high when the St. Francis Dam failed in the disaster of 1928.

SAMSUNG CSCView of section of downed road path and parts of leftover concrete from the St. Francis dam can be seen to the left. The original mass of concrete once stood nearly 200 feet tall.

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Memorial plaque of the St. Francis dam on concrete remains of dam.

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Along the start of my trail of the now broken unused section of  San Francisquito road.

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Along my trail. Section of  downed road now mostly covered by trees and brush.

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Around the middle of the path of my trail.

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Concrete dust, rubble, and chunks of the St. Francis dam remains.

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A nice portion of the remains of the St. Francis dam which can easily be seen and walked through from the side of the now unused section of San Francisquito road which can be viewed all the way to the right upper edge.

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A narrow bridge which was also used on the commute and now abandoned from the rains that had compromised this section of road.

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A section of road that had given way to the rain.

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Hydroelectric power plant known as Power station 2. This is actually a rebuild of the original power station 2 which was caught in the wake of the St. Francis dam collapse and completely destroyed. You can see the three large pipelines that distribute water through the valley and other hydroelectric plants in California.

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A little closer view of the reconstructed hydroelectric power plant.

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Lower bed of the hydroelectric power plant station 2.

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